Daily Archives: May 6, 2019


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Shared Parenting after a Divorce is the Healthiest Option Divorce is difficult for anyone and everyone involved in the process. Even if the divorce is amicable, that doesn’t make it easy.  Deciding what party gets custody of the children and parenting powers is difficult.  Despite being difficult, it is a decision that needs to be made. In the past, it was tradition to award only one parent parenting powers.  This parent would often be the mothers because it was believed that mothering instinct was powerful and that it was a requirement for anyone growing up.  For the most part, this notion is being dismissed as outdated and inaccurate. A more modern but still outdated approach is to assign visitation hours to a parent, most often the father.  The term visitation implies that the parent is something less than they are.  It also is demoralizing. The best approach to parenting after a divorce is to split the parenting as equally as possible.  While the best approach is to have the parenting split 50/50, the minimal amount that a parent should be with their child(children) is 35%.  This allows for a connection between the parent and the child, it also allows for the both parties to feel appreciated. A split parenting position for divorce isn’t just something that the courts thought would be in the best interest of both parents, it is something that has been studied thoroughly. Over 50 studies have been conducted into shared parenting.  Parents and children from around the world have been studied to determine the optimal parenting situation for children of divorces.   Those kids who stayed with both parents for at least 35% for each parent did far better in life. Both academic and social lives improved, as well as psychological health. No matter who you are […]

Shared Parenting after a Divorce


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Child support is the continuous payment made periodically by a parent for the benefit of the child. Different states provide different ways under their law on how to apply for a child support order. In Texas, the process of child support can overwhelm someone who does not have any idea what to expect. Being able to know what step will come next is helpful in preparing and going through the whole process. The following are the important steps in the process: Establishing of Paternity This is one of the most essential and important parts of a case for child support. Paternity is defined as  “legal fatherhood.” The establishment of paternity can help fathers have not only a legal relationship but also an emotional bond with the child or children. This process benefits the whole family. It is also important to remember that for parents that are unmarried, the birth father does not have any legal rights over the child until after paternity is established. Obtain a Court Order A person who wishes to file for support order must be file before the court  where the child lives. If the child is in another state, and the noncustodial parent lives in Texas, then the filing must take place in in the county where the other parent lives. Fill out the correct petition form for child support. The full names of each child, their birthdates, the one filing for child support’s name, his or her Social Security number and driver’s license, and the other parent’s name and address are the information that will be needed in the form. Some forms may need to be notarized. After notarization, make several copies before filing them with the court clerk. The court clerk will stamp on all the copies with the date of when they […]

How to File a Support Order in Texas



CPS Parent Resource Guide Cover
Teenage Parents and Former Foster Youth Parents   Teenage parents, those under the age of 18, can become involved with CPS as a child, as a parent, or both. For children under the age of 18, CPS becomes involved if the child is being abused or neglected, and as a parent CPS becomes involved if the parent are neglecting or abusing their child.   Just like any parent, teenage parents are responsible for keeping their child safe. Everything in the guide applies to teenagers as parents, and teenage parents can have their children removed. Because you are a teenager, your lawyer can ask for special kinds of help. For example, you might be able to get help finishing school, home services so that you can care for your baby while working your Service Plan, or one-on-one help from people who are trained to work with teenagers. Other help might include things like getting your driver’s license, opening a bank account, getting transportation to visit with your child, or finding housing.   In the end, even though you are a parent, you are also still a legally a child, which means you may need more or different kinds of services than older parents.   Finally, if you are a teenager who is involved with CPS, as a parent AND as a child, you can ask CPS for birth control, if that is something you want or need. This is your right; you do not need the consent of your parents, your caseworker, your foster parents, or anyone else. If your CPS worker does not assist you in acquiring birth control, then you can talk to your doctor.   If your parent is hurting you or your child, you need to get help. You should immediately call the police. You can also […]

CPS Parent Resource Guide Part 13: Special Topics


illegitimate child
Single parenthood, in recent years, has been increasing dramatically. Every year, there are more than a million children who were born to unmarried parents. This is becoming an issue when talking about a child’s mental and emotional development. Especially in cases involving the child’s legal rights and legitimacy, proving the paternity has been very crucial. If the child’s parents cannot establish paternity, their child will grow up not having a legitimate father. This will, later on, raise concerns of discrimination between non-marital children and those children who were born to married parents particularly in the issue of inheritance. The Texas Family Code enumerated the instances where paternity is already presumed. When the child was born during the marriage, paternity has already been established between the father and child. All the conditions stated provide that the parents should be or has been married. One should go through a legal proceeding in order to establish the paternity of the alleged father of a child born out of wedlock. How to Prove Paternity The most common way to test paternity is through DNA testing. This is done by obtaining a tissue or blood sample from the child and from the alleged biological father. Physical characteristics say a lot in identifying that a man could be the father of a child. However, DNA testing is the most plausible method in establishing paternity. Although it may be costly, the results would be reliable. The court acknowledges this as solid evidence. Producing legal documents can also help to prove paternity. An example is a birth certificate which provides the name of the man who is allegedly the father. Another possibility that could be used as proof is to show that the alleged father claims the child as his dependent. This is usually proven in payment of […]

Establishing the Paternity of a Deceased Father   Recently updated !