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What a Bill of Review Means in a Family Law Case in Texas
First and foremost, what is a bill of review? Basically, a bill of review is a method to secure a new trial after the initial trial has ended. For instance, if you had a case in Texas and you were not satisfied with the result, you have the option to seek means to get a new trial. One option is to file a motion for a new trial, and another is an equitable bill of review. If you had received a default judgment, the best way to approach your case is to file a motion for a new trial. You can get a fresh start with your case when you file the motion for a new trial within thirty days from the day the judgment is signed.   On the other hand, a bill of review can be filed anytime from four months to four years from the day the judgment was signed in court. There is an exception to this rule though. If you can prove that fraud was involved and it greatly influenced the ruling of the judge, you might be granted a bill of review even after the 4-year period is over. An example of this would be when you have enough evidence that you were lied to by the opposing party, which caused you to fail to show up in court on the day of the trial.     How to Get a Bill of Review Granted   How can you increase your chances of successfully winning a bill of review motion? Of course, there is a standard set in Texas law that states what things are needed to win a hearing for bill of review. We can also take a look at what is needed in a motion for new trial to get an idea […]

How to Use a Bill of Review for Family Law in Texas